Clinton’s PowerPointer:
With Data and Slides, a Pollster Guides Campaign Strategy


It was fairly simple, Mark J. Penn said calmly to Vice President Al Gore, reporting the findings of an exhaustive survey he had conducted in the early stages of the 2000 presidential campaign. Voters liked Gore’s policies. They just didn’t like Gore.

Gore laughed, according to people who attended the meeting. He had heard that before. But the vice president, worried about the effect President Bill Clinton’s scandals might have on his campaign, had another question for his pollster: Was there any evidence of this “Clinton fatigue” that people kept talking about?

“I’m not tired of him,” Penn replied. “Are you?”