PC Magazine: Microsoft Names Former Clinton Aide Mark Penn Chief Strategy Officer

Satya Nadella is still decorating his new office as Microsoft CEO, but he’s wasted no time making sweeping executive changes. In the same internal memo that announced the departure of senior leaders Tony Bates and Tami Reller, the company revealed that Mark Penn is Redmond’s new chief strategy officer.

Penn joined Microsoft as a full-time employee in 2012 after two decades of advising Microsoft co-founder Bill Gates. He worked for decades as a political advisor and pollster, coming to prominence with partner Doug Schoen with their work on Ed Koch’s 1977 mayoral campaign. Along with Michael Berland, they had founded polling and market research firm Penn Schoen Berland (PSB) a couple of years earlier.

Penn served as an advisor to President Bill Clinton from 1994 to 2000, and later assisted Sen. Hilary Clinton in her successful Senate runs and unsuccessful presidential bid in 2008.

Prior to joining Microsoft, he was CEO of Burson-Marsteller, leaving the PR firm in 2012 to become a corporate vice president and strategy specialist in Redmond.

“Mark brings a blend of data analysis and creativity that has led to new ways of working and strong market outcomes such as the ‘Honestly’ campaign and the Super Bowl ad, both of which were widely cited as examples of high impact advertising across the industry,” Nadella said in a memo.

Penn’s work also includes the famed anti-Google “Scroogled” campaign, as well as the Google-versus-Bing “blind taste test” advertisements, the New York Times pointed out.

Reporting to Nadella, Penn has earned a spot on the Senior Leadership Team (SLT) and will continue aiding Microsoft’s competitive research and analysis departments. He will, however, turn over the company’s advertising budget to executive Chris Caposella.

“I am looking forward to applying Mark’s unique skill set across a broader set of challenges facing the company, from new product ideas to helping shape the overall areas of strategic investment,” Nadella said.

Read the full article at PC Magazine

The New York Times: A Political Brawler, Now Battling for Microsoft

SEATTLE — Mark Penn made a name for himself in Washington by bulldozing enemies of the Clintons. Now he spends his days trying to do the same to Google, on behalf of its archrival Microsoft.

Since Mr. Penn was put in charge of “strategic and special projects” at Microsoft in August, much of his job has involved efforts to trip up Google, which Microsoft has failed to dislodge from its perch atop the lucrative Internet search market.

Drawing on his background in polling, data crunching and campaigning, Mr. Penn created a holiday commercial that has been running during Monday Night Football and other shows, in which Microsoft criticizes Google for polluting the quality of its shopping search results with advertisements. “Don’t get scroogled,” it warns. His other projects include a blind taste test, Coke-versus-Pepsi style, of search results from Google and Microsoft’s Bing.

The campaigns by Mr. Penn, 58, a longtime political operative known for his brusque personality and scorched-earth tactics, are part of a broader effort at Microsoft to give its marketing the nimbleness of a political campaign, where a candidate can turn an opponent’s gaffe into a damaging commercial within hours. They are also a sign of the company’s mounting frustration with Google after losing billions of dollars a year on its search efforts, while losing ground to Google in the browser and smartphones markets and other areas.

Read the full article at The New York Times

The Wall Street Journal: Mark Penn, Microsoft’s New Strategist, Hopes to Boost Bing



Microsoft has hired Mark Penn–a well-known political strategist, pollster and CEO of the Burson-Marsteller public-relations firm–to a new corporate strategy role reporting directly to Steve Ballmer. The initial focus: igniting more consumer use of Bing, the Microsoft Web search engine.

In an interview, Mr. Penn said he is assembling a “SWAT team” to work on thorny strategy questions around Microsoft consumer projects. His initial priority, Mr. Penn said in the interview, would be Bing, which lags far behind Google in market share and revenue despite billions of dollars of investment from Microsoft. Mr. Penn, whose appointment was announced Thursday, will have a new post as corporate vice president of strategic and special projects.

Mr. Penn said coming to Microsoft reflects his interest in technology, stemming from his youth when he built his own computer from a kit. “You could say fairly that politics and technology have been my two passions since I was about 12,” Mr. Penn said. He has consulted for Microsoft previously, including during the U.S. government’s antitrust lawsuit against the company a decade ago.

Mr. Penn said his new post germinated from a review he conducted about six months ago — at Mr. Ballmer’s request — of how Microsoft products are presented to the public. During that period, Mr. Penn said he became intrigued with Bing’s quality as a search engine. For Mr. Ballmer’s part, Mr. Penn said the Microsoft boss was intrigued with Mr. Penn’s comparison of the marketing challenge of Bing to pitching a political candidate. With search engines, Mr. Penn said, “People these days are making a choice, just like they’re making a political choice.”

Read the full article at The Wall Street Journal Digits blog

Arthur W. Page Society: Advising the CEO and The King’s Speech

By MARK PENN
Published April 19, 2011

While The King’s Speech was a great movie, it was also a great example of how to advise a CEO or other important leader. As the story unfolds, Lionel Logue, the King’s speech therapist, goes from the unwanted outsider to the trusted adviser through a process that dates back to Joseph and the Pharaoh. The relationship is based on trust, respect, a proven process, evidence-based advice and confidence. These are the same essential elements of advising a CEO, and all of them are illustrated as the movie unfolds.

Lionel teaches the King a few lessons in humility and self-respect. However, he also teaches all of us who get a chance to advise influential people just how to form that special relationship. The movie also underscores that just as important as having good advice is being able to deliver it in way that those you advise can hear it and use it.

Tony Blair said to me one day when planning out his third re-election campaign – “I feel like I am standing in front of a locked door without a key.” The point of that process was to help him find the key to his most difficult problem. And that is what Lionel did – he did not solve the King’s problem; rather, he helped the King find the fortitude within himself to overcome the obstacles standing in his way.

Read Full Article

PRWeek: Mark Penn on PRWeek’s 2010 Power List 25

Mark Penn ranks #13 on PRWeek’s PR Power List of the 25 most powerful leaders in the communications industry in 2010.

Mark Penn
Worldwide president and CEO, Burson-Marsteller

Love him or hate him, public affairs guru Mark Penn has the ear of some of the most powerful people in the world, having worked with luminaries such as Bill Clinton, his wife Hillary, and former British Prime Minister Tony Blair.

In terms of Washington power brokers, Burson-Marsteller’s Penn stands right at the top of the food chain. His challenge is to remain relevant and influential in a rapidly changing global political climate, and to lead his Burson- Marsteller empire from the front and ensure key staff members come along for the ride.

Download the PR Power List 2009 (pdf format)

PRWeek: Mark Penn on PRWeek Power 25

Mark Penn ranks #10 on PRWeek’s PR Power List of the 25 most powerful leaders in the industry in 2009.

Mark Penn [’08 rank - #10]
CEO, Burson-Marsteller

Last year wasn’t easy for Mark Penn. His candidate lost the presidential primary, and his actions were publicly cited for the loss of his firm’s client, Colombia. Yet Penn remains resilient. He is active on client work, including pitching key accounts, and he doesn’t shy away from defending the industry. When MSNBC personality Rachel Maddow took Penn and his firm to task for its client roster, including AIG, Penn defended the importance of its services, even to embattled companies, in an internal memo. And despite Hillary Clinton’s defeat, there’s no doubt that Penn will remain politically influential in the future.

Download the PR Power List 2009 (pdf format)

Psychology Today: A Personal Interview with Mark Penn about Getting Through Tough Times in Life and Politics

Why don’t you start by telling me some of the toughest moments you’ve been through when advising people in tough situations.

The truth is that in today’s world, there’s no success without failure. If you can’t tolerate a failure, it’s virtually impossible to have a successful life. The road to success is paved with roadblocks. Difficult moments, things that have gone wrong, attacks you didn’t expect. To be successful you have to be able to overcome and learn from failure. The moment you lose that perspective, you don’t climb back from that.

Maybe it’s easier said than done. How do you remind yourself at the toughest moment that it’s an inevitable part of success and that you just need to get through it? How do you keep a long-term view?

You’re right to say that it’s not easy—to really understand what you’re about, where you’re going. If you look at movies, almost all movies and popular culture are based on the idea of someone who’s different standing up. But in reality, being different and standing up and having a counter view is one of the hardest things to do in our society.

I try to remember that it’s not necessarily about what everybody else thinks at that moment. It’s really about, “Are you going to have the kind of strength and fortitude to carry through with what you believe in, even against the odds?” That’s what’s made me a tough competitor and a fighter that people relied upon through their difficult situations. When you find yourself in difficult situations, are you the shoemaker without shoes? You have to be able to find some of that personal fortitude.

Are you thinking of any movies in particular?

I grew up on movies like Mr. Smith Goes to Washington and Inherit the Wind that were always about standing up for what you believe regardless of the pressure. Today you can go to even kids’ movies and they are always about the bee, the penguin, or the cub who grows up by standing up.

My most successful strategies—like “soccer moms” in ‘96 for President Clinton or the Upstate Strategy for Hillary in 2000—were always opposed by just about everyone, and I can tell you that fighting for things outside the zone of conventional wisdom will always take a lot of flak, and a lot of energy to sustain.

Read Full Article

ABC News Nightline: Meet Clinton’s ‘Number Junkie’



Meet Clinton’s ‘Number Junkie’: Despite Influential Role in Clinton Campaign, ‘Microtrends’ Author Says He’s No Karl Rove

Mark Penn is a self-described numbers junkie who started out as a shy boy from the Bronx, N.Y. Penn’s shyness has actually become an asset — he wanted to discover what people were thinking without having to ask them.

Penn conducted his first poll at age 13. It was a poll about race relations in America, and the moment he sent it out, he said he realized, “Wow, I can find out what different people thought by sending out flyers and analyzing them, and being a different detective. & I always found it fascinating from this very first poll.”

He now polls on everything from the Iraq War to what television shows people watch (Republicans like “24,” he said. And for the last 10 years he has been the man that Bill and Hillary Clinton have enlisted to help them figure out what voters think.

New York Observer: Rumpled Mark Penn, Clinton Pollster, Goes Back to Battle



Rumpled Mark Penn, Clinton Pollster, Goes Back to Battle

“…For more than a decade now, Mr. Penn, 53, has functioned as the Clintons’ left hemisphere, drafting and interpreting meticulous and incessant surveys to furnish them, along with his other clients, with the market-tested language and policies to get them into power—and keep them there.

In the words of Doug Schoen, his polling partner for more than 30 years in the firm Penn, Schoen & Berland Associates, “Mark is somebody who is very, very comfortable with quantification. He is very comfortable with numbers and very comfortable to be able to see things in black and white.”

One gets the impression, talking to Mr. Penn, that he’d be happy enough dealing with data and nothing else…”

Washington Post: Clinton’s PowerPointer

Clinton’s PowerPointer:
With Data and Slides, a Pollster Guides Campaign Strategy


It was fairly simple, Mark J. Penn said calmly to Vice President Al Gore, reporting the findings of an exhaustive survey he had conducted in the early stages of the 2000 presidential campaign. Voters liked Gore’s policies. They just didn’t like Gore.

Gore laughed, according to people who attended the meeting. He had heard that before. But the vice president, worried about the effect President Bill Clinton’s scandals might have on his campaign, had another question for his pollster: Was there any evidence of this “Clinton fatigue” that people kept talking about?

“I’m not tired of him,” Penn replied. “Are you?”

--->