Fox Business: Is the email scandal over, or will it continue to weigh on Clinton?

Mark Penn, 2008 Chief Campaign Strategist for Hillary Clinton, with the latest on the 2016 presidential campaign trail.

Fox Business: At the Democratic Convention (Day 4)

Mark Penn discusses the Democratic National Convention with Maria Bartiromo on Fox Business News.

MSNBC: How Can Clinton Overcome Criticism?

Pollster Mark Penn discusses Hillary Clinton’s DNC speech, the points she made, and the effect it could have on poll numbers.

Fox Business: Is Clinton highlighting the historical significance of her nomination too much?

Mark Penn, Hillary Clinton’s 2008 Chief Campaign Strategist, on Hillary Clinton’s political career and presidential nomination.

The Atlantic: Mark Penn on the State of the Election

From the viewpoint of the Democratic National Convention in Philadelphia, Mark Penn joined The Atlantic’s Washington Editor at Large, Steve Clemons for an in depth conversation on the state of the race and the many issues facing the country.

MSNBC: The Last Word with Lawrence O’Donnell

Mark Penn, a democratic pollster and veteran of the Bill Clinton and Hillary Clinton war rooms, discusses the latest campaign polls with Lawrence O’Donnell on MSNBC’s The Last Word.

Fox Business: Tax reform the top issue for the next president?

Former Hillary Clinton Campaign Senior Strategist Mark Penn on Hillary Clinton’s scandals, her tax plan and the Republican field in the presidential race.

The Atlantic: Americans Are No Longer Optimists

By MARK PENN and DONALD BAER
Published July 1, 2014

A survey reveals deep uncertainty the country’s future—but also growing consensus on issues like same-sex marriage and marijuana.

Historically, Americans have been optimistic about the future and confident about our leadership in the world, while at the same time being deeply divided on so-called social issues like same-sex marriage and marijuana use. That trend appears to be reversing, giving way to what might be called an age of impossibility, where Americans are deeply uncertain about our country’s future, according to a special survey commissioned for The Atlantic and the Aspen Institute for the tenth Aspen Ideas Festival. The survey, an online poll of more than 2,000 Americans, was conducted by Penn Schoen Berland, working with Burson-Marsteller, from May 28 to 31, 2014.

The poll is a jarring wake-up call to anyone who still believes America is a country of optimists. Nearly two-thirds of Americans—65 percent—question whether America will be on the right track in 10 years. They are also split on whether the country will be a “land of opportunity” (33 percent say yes, 42 percent say no, and 24 percent say they don’t know). In their view, the American Dream itself seems to be fading. Seven in 10 Americans have real doubts about whether working hard and playing by the rules will bring success in the future. They are also concerned about their children’s futures. Despite falling unemployment in many states, 64 percent of parents believe it will be difficult for their children to find good jobs in 10 years.

Read Full Article at The Atlantic

Huffington Post: We Need a Shot in the Arm, if Not a Moonshot

Huffington Post: We Need a Shot in the Arm, if Not a Moonshot
By Mark Penn and Don Baer, November 11, 2013

The recent dysfunction in Washington, with its massive collateral damage to the economy and national morale, couldn’t have come at a worse time. It was no mere blip in America’s otherwise good spirits. In fact, Americans haven’t thought the country was on the right track since 2004.

And now, according to a global poll commissioned by Thomson Reuters on “The New Professional,” it seems that not only are professionals in developed markets like the U.S. low on the drive, hunger, and entrepreneurial spirit that used to fuel our economy — but professionals in emerging-market countries like China, India, and Brazil are more than picking up the slack.

According to the poll, conducted by Penn Schoen Berland in partnership with Thomson Reuters in February and March of this year, only 29 percent of professionals in developed markets such as the US and the UK describe themselves as “always” or “almost always” optimistic, compared to a sizeable 48 percent of professionals in emerging-market countries such as China, India, and Brazil. When asked to rate the statement “I believe hard work will always be rewarded,” a paltry 17 percent of developed-market professionals strongly agreed, compared to 42 percent of emerging-market professionals. And regarding the statement, “I want to be able to be entrepreneurial in my job,” only 30 percent of developed-market professionals strongly agreed, compared to fully 58 percent of professionals in emerging markets.

Read the full article at The Huffington Post

Mark Penn discusses public opinion polling at the Graduate School of Political Management

Mark Penn, former senior adviser to President Bill Clinton, discusses public opinion polling and its role in presidential decision making with senior officials from the Clinton and George W. Bush White Houses.

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